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The state of Florida took a step towards marijuana reform on Monday when Governor Rick Scott (R) signed into law a bill allowing the use of marijuana extracts low in THC but high in cannabidiol.

The state of Florida took a step towards marijuana reform on Monday when governor Rick Scott (R) signed into law Senate Bills 1030 and 1700. The former will allow only the use of marijuana extracts low in THC but high in cannabidiol (CBD), like the strain Charollete’s Web, featured last year in a CNN documentary. Senate Bill 1700 will protect the information of patients who take part in the program.

Recently, there has been a wave of similar CBD-only legislative efforts across several more conservative states. A small number of patients who benefit from the cannabinoids that can’t get you “high” may see some relief from these laws, but many others will continue to suffer, like cancer patients on chemotherapy who benefit from marijuana that contains significant amounts of THC. Many politicians think continuing to send a message in support of marijuana prohibition is seen as more important than helping these people.

Fortunately, for those numerous patients in Florida left out by this new law the voters of Florida may soon adopt a full medical marijuana program. On the ballot is a constitutional amendment to allow medical marijuana and if gets at least 60 percent of the vote it will be adopted. The measures is sponsored by United for Care and polling shows it on track to approval.

While Scott signed this CBD-only law, he opposed the broader medical marijuana constitutional amendment.

Jon Walker is the author of After Legalization: Understanding the future of marijuana policy